Williams Legato 88-Key Digital Piano Review – How Good Is It?

Williams Legato 88-Key Digital Piano Review

The Williams Legato 88-key digital piano is an entry-level keyboard/digital piano that boasts a full range of octaves and 88 keys. With a good sound, this digital piano should be more than enough for most piano students looking to learn the ropes. That said, it’s definitely a slightly more budget-conscious option and will probably leave seasoned pianists wanting more. Read on for the full Williams Legato 88-key digital piano review.

Williams Legato 88-Key Digital Piano Review
Williams Legato 88-Key Digital Piano

How Does The Williams Legato Look And Sound?

The Williams Legato is an entry level keyboard/digital piano that comes in at a low budget price.  This makes it a lot cheaper than some other digital pianos such as the Yamaha P45B. That said, the price difference is reflected in some of the features and sound quality.

To look at, the Williams Legato is definitely a relatively basic model. At just 19 pounds it’s very light indeed for an instrument marketing itself as a ‘digital piano’.  This might though be seen as a positive for anyone who moves home regularly, or perhaps a young child who would like to take their piano with them to lessons or to friends’ houses. Battery operation only makes this model more portable, as do the built-in speakers

Demo Video On Williams Legato 88-Key Digital Piano

This Video Really Shows Off The Williams Legato:

Despite being ‘cheap and cheerful’ for a digital piano, it is nevertheless a more ‘serious’ option for parents looking to support their child’s musical aspirations. This is owing first and foremost to the full-sized 88 keys. This makes a big difference as compared with a keyboard with just 5 or 6 octaves, which makes playing certain songs (and especially duets) impossible. With a full-sized keyboard, pianists will be able to tackle any kind of music.

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The keys are also ‘semi-weighted’ to try and mimic the feel of the action on a real upright or grand piano. This makes playing the Williams Legato a more authentic experience and should result in more ‘transferrable skills’.

The Williams Legato, just like the Yamaha P35, features 32-note polyphony, which means sounds won’t cut out when playing large chords. It may though struggle with heavy use of a sustain pedal (not included).

What Are The Features Of The Williams Legato 88-Key Digital Piano?

The Williams Legato 88-key digital piano is somewhat ‘light’ on features. For instance, it only comes with 5 separate voices (piano, electric piano, organ, synth, and bass). There is a ‘dual mode‘ however which allows players to use two separate voices at the same time. This can either affect the entire 88 keys, or can be used in a split mode that separates the two instruments to different halves of the keyboard – effectively allowing you to play a duet with yourself or to move the bass clef to an entirely different instrument. A built-in metronome is useful for keeping time meanwhile. Voices can also be further edited with reverb and chorus effects (also found on the Yamaha YPG-535) which can be applied and removed for each voice and stored for future use.

This keyboard also comes with USB connections which provides compatibility with a range of different music programs and devices for educational purposes or for those interested in saving their compositions or recording music in high fidelity.

One thing to be aware of with this piano though is that no power adapter is included, and instead must be bought separately.  See the accessories section below.

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Williams Legato 88-Key Digital Piano price

 

Who Is This Keyboard For?

Williams Legato is a digital piano

The Williams Legato is a digital piano as a result of its full 88-keys, but in every other way it is essentially a basic electric keyboard. This makes it a suitable option for beginners looking to learn the piano/keyboard, and possibly for older children. At its very affordable price, it’s the kind of instrument that doesn’t involve too big of an investment if you have a child who enjoys trying out and giving up new hobbies.

At the same time though, the fact that this device offers a full keyboard gives it a big advantage over 5 or 6 octave instruments. This means that when you progress to playing full songs, you’ll have ample space to do so and won’t feel cramped. This instrument will also be suitable for duets for the same reason.

This isn’t a keyboard for a young child however. Not only is the piano designed to provide a relatively authentic experience that won’t take kindly to being bashed aggressively, but it also lacks the extra features that many younger players enjoy. If you’re looking for a keyboard that can make a variety of fun sounds and that provides lots of built-in demo songs, then this isn’t the option for you. For more serious players though, these extra settings could well be considered to be distractions.

Specifically then, this digital piano is a good option if you want a cheap, affordable and portable digital piano, and should be a great choice for beginners and intermediates.  If you’re a more serious pianist though – or if you’re looking to become one – you may be better served by something like the Yamaha P45B

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more Article on  Digital Piano are as

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Yamaha P45 Review

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Casio PX 860 Review

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MusiciansFriend.com

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